Wednesday, 12 January 2011

Original Vegetarians

From Volume 14-15 of Punch magazine in 1848


[I posted this first in a forum relating to a claim that the word 'vegetarian' originally came from Alcott House in 1847... And edited it a little...]

'original vegetarians'? .. do they mean those who coined the term 'vegetarian'? or as Punch sketched in 1848? i've posted below? (see previous post below)

isn't it a human thing... to find certain things distasteful... to have a great affinity for animals and choose not to eat them... it's not dictated by the existence of a word... or the existence of writings about a single place ... but what was the landscape like in 1847?

1855 - US - Vegetarian Settlement Company - dedicated to the vegetarian lifestyle and diet .. a few men got together in NY and settled in Kansas...
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/1912/v/vegetarian_settlement_co.html

page 140 and 142 of Punch Volume 14 and 15 in 1848... which discusses the 'Vegetarian Advocate' and a vegetarian movement in Manchester... also i see mentioned on IVU's site - here:
http://www.ivu.org/history/england19a/truth-tester.html

I note that the letter from an individual in Hamshire to the editor of Truth Tester in Apr 1847 :
"I have often thought it desirable, that vegetarians as a body, were better organized" suggests that he has been using the term vegetarian from before 1847...
http://www.ivu.org/congress/1847/letters.html

1848 - Hollen's Dollar magazine in the US editorial wrote: - merely suggests that the author of the article has not heard of the term 'vegetarian' -
"The vegetable eaters, who a few years since, made so much noise amongst us, being stirred up by Dr Graham, have lately sprouted up in great numbers in England. There are there called Vegetarians, and they have become so numerous that they have a representative in Parliament, and have recently been having vegetable banquets all over England; and we shall not be astonished if, by and by, we hear talk of the roast potatoes, instead of the roast beef of old England. If Punch is to be relied upon, vegetable eating in England has become a kind of mania... " etc...

Popular Science magazine covered the term 'Vegetarian' as it was being used in 1885...
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=2CsDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA325&dq=vegetarian&pg=PA325#v=onepage&q=vegetarian&f=false

In November 1847, Joseph Brotherton Esq, (MP) created a Vegetarian Society in Ramsgate - with many people from around the country... he had abstained from animal products for the last 38 years ...
- The Preston Guardian - Sat 20 Nov 1847 - [Issue 1838]

and then it was reported in most of the local newspapers around the country in November and December (1847)...

Joseph Brotherton was also involved with the abolition of slavery at the time... (as he mentioned in his speech at a dinner thrown for him in Sept 1838 when he won the Salford election) 

further historic pre-1847 uses of the word 'vegetarian' which may or may not include dairy...

A story called 'The Vegetarian' which doesn't mention the use of milk in the diet by Fanny E. Lacey published in The Metropolitan, volume 48 in 1846...
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=DvoEAAAAQAAJ&dq=vegetarian&pg=PA403

The 1802 Anglo-Bengali dictionary defines Vegetarian and Vegetarianism ... (was this 1802 or a mistake by Google Books (should it be 1892?)

1832 The Royal Society of Literature did a piece on Shelley...
"In his vegetarian period he would at any time of day or night cut a slice of bread and sprinkle it with dry currants kept loose in his waistcoat pocket."

1774 - London of to-day: an illustrated handbook - "Vegetarianism may be practised at a restaurant near Duke Street Oxford Street at the Arcadian in Queen Street Cheap side or at the Apple Tree in London Wall within the City and rather out of the track of ladies Those however most curious in the matter of vegetarian diet might take a peep into the Central Vegetarian Dining and Tea Rooms a rough and ready sort of place in St Bride Street near Ludgate Circus and read the prices and items therein exhibited of Diners a la carte the sixpenny tea tray and the ninepenny tea tray a marvellous assortment of homely and wholesome dishes of vegetables and of meal served at a very cheap rate "
[edit - this book is not from 1774 - but the 1890s]

1785 "Food in health and disease" there is a discussion of the 'vegetarian' diet by Isaac Burney Yeo. (sourced on Google Books)
[edit - this book also is not from 1785]

in 1700
L'abstinence de la viande rendue aisée, ou moins difficile à pratiquer: ou Regime de vie avec lequel on peut prévenir ou rendre moins grandes les incommoditez ...
is a surprise from a Frenchman (Barthélemy Linand)... :) but he uses milk... (and not the word 'vegetarian')

and i find the term vegetarian in Poems on Affairs of State: 1678-1681, edited by E. F. Mengel -
"the observation of the vegetarian hermit Roger Crab (1621-1680): 'Butchers are excluded from juries; but the receiver is worse than the thief; so the buyer is worse than the butcher.'"

ah .. now Roger Crab is interesting...